Tag Archives: sewing

DIY Nut Milk Bag

DIY Nut Milk Bag

I love almond milk, but I hate buying it. All the preservatives and god knows what – there’s got to be a better way, right? There is. You can make your own. I’ve posted a recipe over on my new blog, She’s So Green, with a full photo tutorial and recipe on making your own almond milk. It’s really easy – almonds, water, blender, and a method of straining it and you too can make your own. Check out the recipe, but make sure you keep reading below to find out how you can make your very own nut milk bag from something you might already have in your kitchen. And since my method ended up giving me TWO nut milk bags, I am going to give away the second one to one of my lucky readers. Details on how to enter to win your very own nut milk bag are at the end of this post! But keep reading to learn how to sew your own.

DIY Nut Milk Bag

Gather your materials. You will need a flour-sack tea towel, and some manner of measuring and cutting it. The towels I have are 24×32 inches, a good size to cut precisely in half and make two. And because it was perfect to make two, there’s a giveaway down below, where you can enter for the chance to win my extra nut milk bag! But I digress, back to the tutorial!

DIY Nut Milk Bag

Fold your tea towel in half, so that it measures 12×16 inches, folded. Mark your tea towel and cut it in half. You want to have two pieces of material, approximately 12×32 inches. Now, on to the sewing! From here on out, we are working with just one of the pieces of tea towel, save the other one to make another nut milk bag, or whatever you like.

DIY Nut Milk Bag

You now have a piece of material that has three hemmed edges, and one raw edge. Fold your fabric, wrong sides together {which side is the wrong side? It doesn’t really matter.} so that the folded dimensions are approximately 12×16 inches. Set it up to sew a narrow seam all the way along the raw edge. You may want to pin before you sew – I didn’t, but I probably should have.

DIY Nut Milk Bag

After you’ve sewn a narrow seam along the unfinished edge, clip the corner where the fabric is folded. This is an optional step, but I find that the corner can get bulky if you don’t clip it, and this gives you some leeway in case your corner isn’t perfectly square.

DIY Nut Milk Bag

Now, turn your fabric inside out. Or right-side in, rather. In the photo above, you can see the raw edges tucked inside. Sew along that edge again, so that the raw fabric edge is tucked inside the seam. This will prevent any fraying as you wash and use this bag for filtering food items. No one wants to find shreds of fabric in their food!

DIY Nut Milk Bag

Now, on to the other side. You don’t need to worry about tucking the edges inside the seam here, as your fabric is presumably already hemmed. So you can just flip the bag over to this side, and sew a seam along the long edge. On this side, however, make sure you leave about an inch or so unsewn at the open end – this will fold down to make a place for a drawstring.

DIY Nut Milk Bag

Now that you have a bag, pin down the open end to make a channel for the drawstring. Once you have it pinned, sew a fairly wide seam {about 1/2 an inch} all the way around to make the drawstring channel.

DIY Nut Milk Bag

Tie some cotton string onto a safety pin. This makes threading the drawstring incredibly easy. If you try to do it without some solid way of pulling the string through, you will want to rip out your hair, I promise.

DIY Nut Milk Bag

Insert the safety pin into the open end of the drawstring channel. Alternate scrunching up the fabric and stretching it out again along the string to slowly advance the safety pin and its attached string through the channel. Once you reach the other side, stretch and smooth it out, and knot the string securely, a couple inches away from the bag when it is completely flat.

DIY Nut Milk Bag

Voila: one drawstring bag for filtering nut milk. Easy, right? I hope it was. I am not a pattern writer, just a crafty chick, so if it’s confusing at all please comment or touch base with me via one of the social media icons on the sidebar, and I would be happy to clarify.

DIY Nut Milk Bag

Now, for the giveaway details. Would you like to win one of these nut milk bags for your very own? The bag is made of 100% cotton, from a clean, never-used {only washed} flour sack tea towel and sewn by yours truly. It has an approximate value of $10 {based on what similar products sell for}, and is available to be won residents of Canada and the US. I have no idea how to set up a fancy giveaway widget, so old-fashioned comments it is. You can get up to 4 entries, and here’s how you can do it:

1. Leave a comment on this entry.
2. Head over to She’s So Green, and leave a comment on the nut milk recipe there. Come back and leave another comment here to get another entry.
3. Tweet out loud and tag @oobinsnaffa, and leave another comment.
4. Like Blissful Domesticity on Facebook, and leave another comment.

Easy, right? I’ll draw a winner on Monday, and I’ll email the winner shortly thereafter, so please make sure the email address attached to your comments is correct. Good luck!

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Hoot Hoot!

With all the stress I’m feeling over my mom’s health, I’ve taken to my craftiness as a sort of therapy to help me cope and center myself. There’s something meditative and peaceful about repetitive tasks, especially ones that come together into a wonderful creation. I’ve been crocheting a fair bit, but I decided to take to my sewing machine when shopping for birthday presents for my daughter’s friend and her sister was an epic failure. I couldn’t find anything that didn’t strike me as cheap, thoughtless, cluttery, or some combination thereof. I went hunting through my dozens of patterns, and ended up drawn to this adorable owl stuffie pattern by retro mama. I bought it months ago with the intent of possibly creating them for my etsy shop (currently on an indefinite hiatus), but this seemed like the perfect project. I remember my friend, mother of the two birthday girls, telling me that whatever her eldest had, her younger sister also wanted, so I opted to make the same thing for them but with different accent fabrics. I dove into my stash of hoarded fabric pieces – bolt ends, fat quarters, scraps and even yardage purchased without a specific project in mind, and pulled out a few of my favourites.

The owls were a pretty quick cut & sew, only a few pieces and really straight-forward steps. I strayed from the pattern instructions just a little, and I hand-sewed on the eyes, feet and beak for each owl, because the time it takes to rethread my machine four times and sew such tiny stitches wasn’t worth it to me. I used a permanent fabric glue to hold the pieces in place while I stitched them down, and also used a small drop of glue on the wrong side of the front to give some reinforcement to the knots that I tied in the hand-sewn threads. I also only used three strands of embroidery floss instead of the whole 6, because I liked the more delicate look of the winking eye.

I’m really, really happy with how these owls turned out, and I’m already mostly done a third, another birthday gift for one of Eliza’s dayhome friends whose birthday party she missed this weekend. I have a feeling I’ll be cutting some more soon too, Eliza asked for one of her own, and I think I know of a few kids who will be getting these sweet little owls as Christmas gifts!

Hello, birdie!

When my daughter asked to be a bird for Halloween, I was overjoyed. I had just seen the most perfect project on Pinterest, and was making mental plans to make her a pair of gorgeous birdie wings to add to her dress-up trunk that Santa is bringing for her. I really wimped out and went easy on her Halloween costume last year as I had just had a baby at the end of September, so this year I was determined to make up for it and make something she’d really love, and something that would continue to get wear after October 31st as a favourite piece of dress-up clothing.

The tutorial over at pluckymomo is super easy to follow, with lots of step-by-step pictures. Rather than using scraps, I decided to hit the discount wall at Fabricland for some 100% cotton, and I ended up finding some great fabrics in rainbow colours, which I knew Eliza would absolutely adore! I used a cotton/poly poplin for a sturdy base, and the rest is all quilting-weight cotton fabric. If you look closely, you can see that I did 3 layers of feathers for each colour except purple, which only got two because of the quarter-circle corner piece.

The only thing I recommend is, instead of using a piece of clothing to measure, get a cloth tape measure and actually measure your child from the center of their back just below the nape of their neck all the way to their wrist. I got a much more accurate measurement this way, my kid is always growing so finding a long-sleeved shirt in her closet that fits was a challenge for me! I also made an extender piece for the neck ribbon, so it could easily be worn over a warm hoodie for trick-or-treating in our chilly climate but also worn inside without the neck strap being super loose. All I did for that was take an extra piece of ribbon, about 4 inches, and added velcro to it the same way I did the main neck strap. Count on having a lot more than 12 inches of ribbon, because you’ll kick yourself if you have to tear it off and re-do it because it’s too short! The sewing itself is a breeze, it took me more time to cut the fabric than it did to sew the entire thing.

And clearly, she loves it. This is exactly what I had hoped for, and every time I see her racing around the house with her birdie wings on, it makes me smile.

Fly, birdie! Fly!

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