Tag Archives: bread

Freezer French Toast

Freezer french toast

French toast is a weekend staple around here, alongside its carby cousins, pancakes and waffles. The kids love it, my husband loves it, and so do I {though I usually limit myself to just one slice, trying to be healthy and all!}. It’s a lot of effort though, and there’s no way I’d have time to make this kind of breakfast for everyone on a busy weekday morning while I’m trying to get my daughter out the door for school. Our weekday mornings are more fruit and cereal mornings – something fast that can be dumped in a bowl and eaten without much fuss. Much easier than making a hot meal! But no more! This freezer french toast has added some much-needed variety to our weekday morning breakfasts, and the kids love having a hot meal instead of cereal. I pop a couple slices in the toaster oven as soon as I’m up, and by the time the kids are up and my coffee’s ready, the french toast is ready to eat. Perfect.

Freezer french toast

My inspiration to make this freezer-friendly french toast came from the Super 8, of all places. We stayed there last fall on a trip, and the kids were all over the french toast that just needed to be popped in the toaster. If Super 8 can have hot french toast as part of their continental breakfast, then surely I can freeze my french toast and reheat it on mornings when I don’t have time to cook a big, hot breakfast! My experiment was a success. On one Saturday morning, I turned an entire loaf of bread into french toast for breakfasts during the upcoming week, and this has been a regular item in my freezer ever since.

Freezer french toast

You can use whatever kind of bread you like for this. Eliza requested cinnamon raisin bread, so the recipe I made for blogging purposes was made with a cinnamon raisin Texas Toast. You could use whatever you like, though – regular sandwich bread, thickly sliced crusty french bread, your options are limited only by the bready goodness at your disposal. For storage, I don’t worry too much about packaging it up perfectly for long-term freezer storage. This french toast never lasts long in our house, so I reassemble the loaf with parchment paper between the slices, and place it back in the original bag. I get out as much air as I can, but freezer burn isn’t usually a concern as it’s all been eaten within a week anyway!

Freezer french toast

Buttermilk French Toast {perfect for freezing!}

1 cup buttermilk
4 eggs
1 tsp vanilla
1 Tbsp honey
3 Tbsp flour
1/4 tsp salt
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp nutmeg
1/4 tsp cardamom
~8 slices Texas Toast-style bread
Butter, for the pan

Heat your pan over medium heat.

Mix together buttermilk, eggs, vanilla, honey, flour, and seasonings. {Tip: use your blender, it takes just a few seconds!}

Dip bread in the egg and milk mixture {I like to give it about 15 seconds a side to let the liquid really soak in}. Add your butter to the hot pan, and drop the soaked bread in. Cook a couple minutes per side, until golden brown and crispy.

For freezing, place on a wire rack to let cool. Once cooled, place in bags for freezer storage and freeze. To reheat, place frozen slices on a baking sheet in a 350F oven for 10-12 minutes. Alternatively, you can microwave them or use your toaster.

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Grandma’s Irish Soda Bread

Irish Soda Bread

If there’s anything that reminds me of my grandmother, it’s bread. Delicious, warm, soft, fresh-from-the-oven bread. The kind that melts butter as you spread it, and is so warm and comforting you feel like you could eat a whole loaf. You shouldn’t, of course, but you want to. I have fond memories of baking bread of all kinds in my grandmother’s kitchen – sandwich bread, french bread, and one of my favourites: soda bread. This has become a family favourite in the Blissful kitchen, too. My husband loves it and requests it often, and my kids devour it when it’s put in front of them. A loaf doesn’t last long around here!

Irish Soda Bread

And what better time to make this true Irish bread than for St. Patrick’s Day? This is a real soda bread, not the Americanized cake version that involves eggs and dried fruit. This is the kind of soda bread you’d find on a farmhouse table at dinner. It’s a simple bread – there is none of the fuss or delicate rising times of yeasted breads. If you have half an hour and all the ingredients, you can have it on the table in time for dinner. It doesn’t keep well and it isn’t a great sandwich bread, but it’s perfect alongside a hearty soup or stew, or just eating with a pat of butter and dollop of jam.

Irish Soda Bread

My grandmother passed away a little over a year ago, and there isn’t a day that goes by that I don’t miss her. I am lucky enough to have some of her recipes, ones that she shared with me once I was grown and had a house of my own to run. This loaf is one of hers, one that I remember making with her, one that baked in the oven while a stew bubbled on the stovetop, one that was passed around that great kitchen table of hers as we all sat down to dinner. If you make it, I hope you enjoy it as much as I do.

Irish Soda Bread

Irish Soda Bread

Please note: I have posted a correction to this recipe – I transposed my notes incorrectly, it should be 2 Tbsp baking powder, 1 tsp baking soda. My apologies! ~ Samantha

Grandma’s Irish Soda Bread

2 cups whole wheat flour
2 cups white flour
2 Tbsp baking powder
1 tsp baking soda
2 tsp salt
2 cups buttermilk {maybe a little more}

Preheat oven to 375F. Prepare a baking sheet by lightly greasing it.

Sift together dry ingredients. Stir in just enough buttermilk to make a soft, shaggy dough. {2 cups of buttermilk is usually enough, but if your dough is dry, you may need a little more.}

Turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface and knead until it comes together into a smooth dough. Shape into a flat round, about 8 inches across, and place the round gently on the prepared baking sheet. Score with a sharp knife, brush with water, and sprinkle with flour. Bake for 30-35 minutes, until loaf sounds hollow when tapped with your fingertips.

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